Textile Labeling RuleOn March 14, 2014, the Federal Trade Commission finalized amendments to the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act. The Act that requires certain items, such as apparel, sold in the U.S. to carry labels with specific information.  Previously this included the generic names, weight of fibers, name of manufacturer or marketer and the country where the product was manufactured. What do these new amendments on textile labeling mean for you and your brand?

The previous mandate on generic names in textile labeling often causes confusion.  It means that Lycra, which is a trademark name, should be listed as spandex in the US.  While in Europe they use the generic term elastane. One of the amendments will allow more flexibility in naming conventions that incorporates internationally used fiber names.

We first learned of this news through WWD.  “The labels on your clothes and shoes are one of the most important ways brands and retailers communicate with their consumers,” said AAFA Executive Vice President Stephen Lamar in the article. “Today’s announcement by the Federal Trade Commission is an important step in updating the guidelines for textile labeling standards in the United States. These changes, for which AAFA has advocated, will help the U.S. apparel and footwear industry to remain competitive in the global marketplace and reduce unnecessary regulatory burdens.”

The new changes mean manufacturers will not have to disclose products full fiber contents on certain hang tags. This rule will allow truthful non-deceptive information about fibers and its performance on the hang tag, as long as the product has a label with full fiber content information that is required by the FTC. To avoid any consumer confusion, the new rule requires the hang tag to disclose such information, such as “See label for full fiber content.”

The full ruling can be seen in this pdf: RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT

We will continue to bring you information on how these changes will effect your labeling.  As well as use this info when designing new product packaging. The amended rules will be effective 30 days after official publication.